History (and future) of modelling materials using interatomic potentials

Prof Sir Richard Catlow (UCL) - Interatomic Potentials: how we have used them for inorganic materials and how we can improve them Prof Olivier Hardouin Duparc (Institut Polytechnique de Paris) - Interatomic potentials: Basic historical developments, with the Natural Intelligence of our brilliant predecessors Prof Sally Price (UCL) - Interatomic potentials for modelling the intermolecular forces between organic molecules, pharmaceuticals and biomolecules
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History (and future) of modelling materials using interatomic potentials

21 September 2022 @ 2:00 pm 4:00 pm

Zoom: https://ucl.zoom.us/j/93479659789

Interatomic Potentials: how we have used them for inorganic materials and how we can improve them – Prof Sir Richard Catlow, UCL

Interatomic potentials: Basic historical developments, with the Natural Intelligence of our brilliant predecessors – Prof Olivier Hardouin Duparc, Institut Polytechnique de Paris
Abstract: If one cannot use Schrödinger, let alone Dirac, for large sets of atoms, one uses interatomic potentials. Interatomic potentials have been proposed ever since scientists know atoms exist and tend to gather, without collapsing together. Attraction and repulsion, first by pairs but also via many-body interactions when some electrons can be exchanged between atoms: I will propose a historical-pedagogical development of these ideas, mainly focused on metals but not only (also semiconductors).

Interatomic potentials for modelling the intermolecular forces between organic molecules, pharmaceuticals and biomolecules – Prof Sally Price, UCL
Abstract: An accurate intermolecular potential should be able to predict all physical properties of a molecule in the solid, liquid and gas. This was achieved for argon about half a century ago, but it is arguable whether it has yet been achieved for water, and certainly not in a form that can be used in standard molecular dynamics codes. For organic molecules, the intermolecular potential is expressed in an atom-atom form. However, the non-sphericity of atoms in molecules, non-additive effects, limited transferability and molecular flexibility may all limit the accuracy of atomistic modelling of the organic solid state for specific molecules, such as pharmaceuticals.

Organised by:

Martijn Zwijnenburg